February 6, 2014

Increased Need for Training to Reduce Violence Against Nurses

A qualitative study on assaults on emergency nurses sponsored by the Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) found a need to better train nurses on signs of potential trouble as well as to change the culture of acceptance, prevalent among hospital administrators and law enforcement. 

"Assaults on emergency nurses have lasting impacts on the nurses and the ability of emergency care facilities to provide quality care," said 2014 ENA President Deena Brecher, MSN, RN, APN, ACNS-BC, CEN, CPEN. "More than 70 percent of emergency nurses reported physical or verbal assaults by patients or visitors while they were providing care. As a result, we lose experienced and dedicated nurses to physical or psychological trauma for days or sometimes permanently. Healthcare organizations have a responsibility to nurses and the public to provide a safe and secure environment."

According to Bureau of Labour statistics, an assault on a healthcare worker is the most common source of nonfatal injury or illness requiring days off from work in the healthcare and social assistance industry.

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Note: The Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) has more than 40,000 members worldwide, is the only professional nursing association dedicated to defining the future of emergency nursing and emergency care through advocacy, expertise, innovation and leadership. Founded in 1970, ENA develops and disseminates education and practice standards and guidelines, and affords consultation to both private and public entities regarding emergency nurses and their practice.